“…and the sound of Te Awamutu had a truly sacred ring…”

Out here in the Maryland woods, we’ve turned on the water, torn out the weeds, set out feasts for nesting birds, and resumed watching our footpaths for snakes. While we wait for our seedlings to flourish and thrive, let’s wander through links about poems and writing and art.

Personal statement, prose poem, or something more? Dale Favier proposes “A Quieter Return.”

Chris Townsend makes plain why a “Walden” video game is a uniquely awful idea.

“Another of those fantastical, insane works I wish someone had forced me to read sooner”: Jake Seliger praises Lonesome Dove.

Chris at Hats & Rabbits is searching in vain for sincere works of popular art.

Prof Mondo gets hand-drawn proof that the kids in his poetry workshop are paying attention.

Flavia finds that devilish temptations make her a better writer.

George is reading to clear his shelves.

Do we get wiser with age? Stephen at First Known When Lost considers the question with his fond intermingling of poems and art.

Midori Snyder discovers Romare Bearden’s beguiling “Black Odyssey” colleges.

A psychologist and a museum director discuss art, and Marly Youmans plucks the prettiest parts.

“What are we supposed to do but keep creating, one way or another?” Poet Tim Miller ponders precedent and starts writing rhymes.

Can you name “America’s greatest living light verse poet”? A.M. Juster can (and does).

It is right and just: Maryann Corbett pens a “Prayer Concerning the New, More ‘Accurate’ Translation of Certain Prayers.”

3 thoughts on ““…and the sound of Te Awamutu had a truly sacred ring…”

  1. Interesting list. Thanks for reminding me about Tim Miller… Although I’m bogged in promises for reading (blurbs and such) at the moment, I need to put his long poem on The List for later.

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  2. Marly, I think you’d like Tim’s work; he is definitely not one to chase current trends, and no one else could have written the epic he did. I exchanged emails with him just the other day, and I suspect he’ll stop by here to answer your question before too long.

    And I know what you mean about those endless reading promises. It’s a tricky balance, this business of supporting other writers while still getting our own work done.

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