“Kindled by the dying embers of another working day…”

According to one Carolingian poet, October was perfect for harvesting grapes and chasing swine into forests to chow down on autumn nuts. Fireside wine and a pig roast can wait; for now, I can offer only this backlog of savory links.

Literary scholar and critic D.G. Myers has died—but his final blog post, “Choosing life in the face of death,” is a worthy memorial.

Another Damned Medievalist explains what should be obvious: that being an adjunct professor is not at all like slavery.

Nancy Marie Brown considers Icelandic volcanoes on the anniversary of Snorri Sturlusson’s killing.

Added to my Christmas list: Medievalism: Key Critical Terms.

Flavia, a college professor, shares what she learned from doing the work she assigns.

At Book and Sword, Sean Manning meets Ötzi, who died in an Alpine pass some 5,300 years ago.

Jake Seliger knows that the best teachers aren’t always the best credentialed.

Scott Bailey offers a fiction-writing lesson from Robert Browning.

Cynthia Haven pays tribute to murdered journalist Steve Sotloff. Did you know he and his loved ones successfully hid his religion from his captors?

The indefatigable Steve Donoghue reads The Oxford Book of Letters.

Pete at Petelit continues to add to his blog post of memorable opening lines.

Recalling his software days, poet Dale Favier notes that “nothing has been built to specs.”

At First Known When Lost, Stephen Pentz links poetry to moments when life “clicks.”

George, the thoughtful fellow at 20011, blogs about coding and cooking, the pleasures of summer, and overuse of the term “iconic.”

Congrats to Tolkien scholar Jason Fisher, whose blog post became a essay in a reference book.

Daniel Franke wonders about Bill Gates and “big history.”

Diane L. Major remembers Harriet Tubman.

3 thoughts on ““Kindled by the dying embers of another working day…”

  1. Thanks for stopping by, Sean!

    I’ll confess that as my interests have gotten more concrete—translation, spotting medievalism in the wild, creating medievalist art of my own—the scholarly circle that studies medievalism has grown increasingly theoretical and abstract, in ways that often elude me. That said, I do find them a thoughtful bunch, and when they focus on discrete phenomena, I find their work illuminating. (I sometimes wonder if I’m not their only enthusiastic reader who is neither a member of their circle nor affiliated with a university…)

    Like

  2. Oh dear, do you know I’ve looked at this post before and followed so many of the links I didn’t even see the one to my blog!? Thank you so much for the shout-out, Jeff. Hoping all is well now that we’re at the other end of the month.

    Like

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